A Blues Scale

In my latest video tutorial, I demonstrated how to play an A Blues scale, and the differences between the more commonly known A Major scale. In an A Major scale, for instance, we have the following scale degrees (as with any major scale), that follow the traditionally major Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half step pattern throughout:


1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 1


OR


A - B - C sharp - D - E - F sharp - G sharp - A


If you've never seen it spelled out in this way it might look a little foreign, but as long as you've played the A Major scale before and know that the key of A Major has three sharps, you should be golden.


In a BLUES scale, however, we have the following scale degrees:


1 - flat 3 - 4 - flat 5 - 5 - flat 7 - 1


which, if you're more into the note names, translates to:


A - C - D - E flat - E - G - A


Little different, right?


Don't let this intimidate you though, because if you commit these seven little notes (not counting the second A) to memory, you will open up a whole world of Blues magic for yourself.


As I mentioned in the video, there are many ways to practice improvising using this singular blues scale, and I encourage you to try as many as you can! Get creative! Mix it up! Because, as we all know, that is the very best way to learn.


If you're interested in more of the nitty gritty on blues and pentatonic scales, as well as seeing the full-fledged version in the form of sheet music, I've provided a practice sheet that you may find useful in your journey to Blues wonderland! Enjoy, and good luck!



Thanks to mattlangley.com for supplying this sheet.

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